the motorcycle diaries obsession

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I am in love {again}.
OK. Maybe not but I am certainly in a state of rapture. Yet to surface from it.
It usually takes several days. During that period my existence is merely physical. A matter than only takes up some space in the universe. Emits some carbon.
My mind is far far away.
Endorphin levels high. Humming Beethoven Symphony No. 5 that evolves mid-way through to Vivaldi’s Four Season. But only the winter season. It’s bleak. I like bleak. Emotions are just acutely more intense.
Back to rapture. It’s a book. I love the book. It’s a movie. I love every second of the movie.
It’s a man. I am obsessed with him.
This is the first. 
To be in a state of rapture with … errr… well, someone dead.
Sounds morbid alright. Hence the hesitation to type it out, but it’s really not what you think.
He died 9 years before I was born. On the 9th day of the month I was born.
hmmm… no wonder he’s such a sentimentalist idealist! 
In any case, I’ll write from the movie’s perspective. It’s easier. 
#1
Ernesto’s lyrical observation of the continent exceeded my expectation through the movie’s interpretation and cinematography.
Chile proved to be more beautiful than I had imagine it to be. The rocky harsh and edgy stone landscape looks amazingly breathtaking amidst the floating white cotton candy clouds.
Gael, while had a more elongated face than Ernesto, was a good choice – his acting was great; some intense brooding that was very well executed and he sure pulled off the coy demure that would melt any woman’s heart! Porcelain veneers would have sealed the deal – Ernesto did have a great set of teeth. { yeah, I noticed. Didn’t I say I am in love/rapture with Ernesto? }
#2
The B+W still shots got its message across but I felt it slightly misses the point. It didn’t hit me in the gut. Maybe I’ve seen too many heart sinking, gut retching B+W photos.
#3
The built-up towards Ernesto’s turning point was flat. Almost non-existence. The movies interpretation here lacks conviction. Superficial. If anything the many scenes of Ernesto interviewing the people made him very much a stereotypical American tourist.
#4
The lighter side of Ernesto was well portrayed but failed miserably at showcasing his quick wit and clever improvisation fixes. What made this even more disappointing is his trademark maverick “improvisation” trait was mentioned in the first 5 minutes of the movie’s opening and in the trailer. 
The failure on this front, made Ernesto look like a free riding scum who took full advantage of his status as (almost) a doctor.
#5
It also placed the entire medical fraternity on the pedestal. Couple with the clique-ish support received, I felt the movie eroded the self discovery journey of Ernesto who is really the premise and foundation of his personal account. His travel notes, which Ernesto himself rewrote into a narrative, recounts almost the opposite in most instances, where those that had nothing of their own were the most generous to him.
#6
Machu Picchu
Alice could be right about it. Another Mona Lisa = Postage Stamp category.
I’m half convince now to leave it for my next lifetime. Gotta be more precise with the reincarnation process here! :p
#7
‘Comeback’… ahhh… well, he was way funnier in the book. The movie misses the entire point!
#8
Thank god they reproduced Ernesto’s demagogic speech made on his 24th birthday that somewhat made up for #3 and #5. 

Well, it’s my duty to respond to the toast offered by Dr. Bresciani with something more than a conventional gesture. In our presently precarious state as travelers, we only have recourse to words and I would now like to use them to express my thanks, and those of my traveling compañero, to all of the staff of the colony who, almost without knowing us, have given us this beautiful demonstration of their affection, celebrating my birthday as if it were an intimate celebration for one of your own. But there is something more. Within a few days we will be leaving Peruvian territory, so these words have the secondary intention of being a farewell, and I would like to stress our gratitude to all the people of this country, who have unfailingly shown us their warmest hospitality since we entered Peru via Tacna.
I would also like to say something else, unrelated to the theme of this toast. Although our insignificance means we can’t be spokespeople for such a noble cause, we believe, and after this journey more firmly than ever, that the division of [Latin] America into unstable and illusory nations is completely fictional. We constitute a single mestizo race, which from Mexico to the Magellan Straits bears notable ethnographical similarities. And so, in an attempt to rid myself of the weight of small minded provincialism, I propose a toast to Peru and to a United Latin America.
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So I guess like all books made into movies … read the book.

I insist. There’s no substitute to a book.

But if you’re BIG into cinematography and look at movies as frames – wide angle frames – put together, this at least fulfills 70% of a wide angle frame orgasmic experience. Watch the movie purely for the cinematography thrill.
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7 thoughts on “the motorcycle diaries obsession

  1. lolah moy worth mentioning you are the master of wide angle. :pBut you are right the trailer looks amazing but aiyoh now you have to spoil my usual no brainer sit and watch movie while munching snacks. I will be damn if my brain works like yours! :p

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